Analyzing 2017 Barrett-Jackson Auction and Mecum Kissimmee Auction Results

Analyzing 2017 Barrett-Jackson Auction and Mecum Kissimmee Auction Results

Classic pickup trucks are coming into their own as recent high profile auctions show. Here is a 1957 Chevrolet Cameo Carrier Pickup from Arizona Classics in Scottsdale. A very nice truck like this sold for $77,000 at the recent 2017 Barrett-Jackson Auction.

 

Market Trends Report Shows Collector Car
Values Remain Flat After High Profile Auctions …

In analyzing 2017 Barrett-Jackson Auction and Mecum Kissimmee Auction results, Cars On Line.com says average prices on collector cars remain the same as last year. The internet’s most popular collector car website sent teams to cover both auctions in January. The expectation of accelerating collector car values peaked the interest in these two high profile auctions. They are a barometer of collector car price trends for the coming spring market. But overall sales figures for both auctions were down slightly from last year.

Cars On Line.com keeps track of price trends in the collector car market. They watch a sample group of collector cars which change hands most frequently.  Then they calculate the average values for these cars. They watch only No. 2 condition cars in their analysis. The average values you see here are calculated based only on vehicles in No. 2 condition, considered show quality. (For a breakdown of condition class, see the Condition Class explanations below.)

Here is what Cars On Line.com found in analyzing 2017 Barrett-Jackson Auction and Mecum Kissimmee Auction results (with average values from the two auctions shown in the “January” column.) The “2016” column shows prices as of the end of the year 2016. The “January” auctions column totals are down from the 2016 column totals by one percent. That wasn’t what collectors were expecting this year.

Year, Make Model Condition 2008 2016  January
FORD
1928 Ford Model A Roadster No. 2 $23,100 $19,900 $26,725
1955 Ford F100 No. 2 $23,100 $24,267 $42,000
1956 Ford Crown Victoria No. 2 $33,500 $33,500 $47,850
1957 Ford Retractable No. 2 $53,700 $44,500 $36,300
1957 Ford Thunderbird No. 2 $55,500 $46,625 $47,250
1965 Mustang Convertible No. 2 $33,800 $31,313 $42,850
1966 Shelby GT350 No. 2 $164,100 $172,688 $132,000
1967 Shelby GT500 No. 2 $191,000 $161,000 $115,500
1967 Mustang GT Fastback (S CODE) No. 2 $26,500 $66,300 $52,250
1969 Mach 1 Mustang (M CODE) No. 2 $37,400 $46,817 $36,500
1969 Mach 1 428 CJ (R CODE) No. 2 $81,000 $67,578 $63,738
1969 Boss 429 Mustang No. 2 $269,500 $281,375 $298,300
1970 Boss 302 Mustang No. 2 $85,000 $72,433 $69,639
1970 Ford Torino 429 CJ No. 2 $45,900 $63,300 $50,000
CHEVROLET
1954 Corvette No. 2 $111,600 $72,025 $75,200
1955 Bel Air Hardtop No. 2 $32,200 $36,725 $56,100
1955 Bel Air Convertible No. 2 $64,750 $76,167 $63,850
1957 Bel Air Hardtop No. 2 $62,700 $51,407 $50,942
1957 Bel Air Convertible No. 2 $94,500 $80,159 $86,642
1957 Cameo Pickup No. 2 $26,250 $43,933 $77,000
1958 Chevy Impala Convt (348 Tripower) No. 2 $99,000 $120,450 $82,500
1963 Corvette Split Window Coupe No. 2 $71,400 $93,107 $86,938
1967 Chevelle SS 396 No. 2 $54,400 $46,308 $47,533
1967 Camaro Convertible No. 2 $28,700 $32,000 $41,750
1967 Corvette 427/435 Convertible No. 2 $250,500 $163,667 $176,950
1969 Camaro Z/28 No. 2 $81,675 $64,632 $71,711
1970 Chevelle SS 396 No. 2 $55,825 $53,750 $48,800
1970 Chevelle LS6 454 No. 2 $98,580 $100,000 $120,920
EDSELS
1958 Edsel Pacer Convertible No. 2 $29,400 $53,950 $45,000
MOPARS
1957 Dodge Sweptside Pickup No. 2 $15,400 $49,625 $150,000
1967 Dodge Coronet R/T No. 2 $22,400 $32,300 $33,000
1970 Dodge Challenger T/A No. 2 $89,600 $72,000 $64,725
1970 Dodge Super Bee No. 2 $54,000 $58,581 $63,850
1967 Plymouth GTX No. 2 $51,500 $36,133 $31,555
1970 Plymouth Cuda AAR No. 2 $99,900 $88,583 $77,000
1970 Plymouth SUPERBIRD No. 2 $156,000 $162,417 $177,025
1970 HEMI Cuda No. 2 $261,400 $242,688 $239,875
1970 Plymouth Road Runner No. 2 $80,300 $49,450 $39,050
CADILLAC
1957 CADILLAC S62 CONVERTIBLE No. 2 $54,950 $77,698 $82,500
1976 CADILLAC ELDORADO CONVERTIBLE No. 2 $16,800 $37,100 $27,150
PACKARD
1953 PACKARD CARIBBEAN CONVERTIBLE No. 2 $42,000 $90,100 $102,500
PONTIAC
1965 PONTIAC GTO (389 TRIPOWER) No. 2 $35,000 $62,233 $40,100
1970 PONTIAC GTO JUDGE No. 2 $56,700 $53,500 $61,966
1973 TRANS AM SUPER DUTY No. 2 $45,000 $80,000 $63,000
1977 BANDIT TRANS AM No. 2 $18,000
$35,800
$46,200
BUICK
1954 SKYLARK CONVERTIBLE No. 2 $72,450 $136,000 $109,825
1970 BUICK GS STAGE 1 CONVERTIBLE No. 2 $89,000 $135,000 $93,500
OLDSMOBILE
1957 OLDSMOBILE STARFIRE CONVERTIBLE No. 2 $62,500 $105,000 $80,300
1970 OLDS 442 W30 No. 2 $57,800 $96,533 $76,000
AUSTIN-HEALEY
1967 AUSTIN HEALEY 3000 BJ8 No. 2 $35,000 $84,500 $42,900
JAGUAR
1967 JAGUAR XKE ROADSTER No. 2 $64,050
$71,904
 $115,500
STUDEBAKER
1957 STUDEBAKER GOLDEN HAWK No. 2 $19,800 $51,500 $95,700

 

CONDITION CLASSES

Class One (Excellent):

Almost always a “body off” restoration, or an untouched, factory-perfect, piece that is very close to perfect. All components are either original or appear as new and are fully operational. This car is a top show winner and is not driven, but transported to shows by trailer. This car is almost “one of a kind”. This particular class of vehicle is very rare. The vehicle is completely detailed, including the engine compartment, interior trim, wiring, suspension, paint, and frame. Ideally, this vehicle has been judged with other vehicles in its class and achieved the highest point ratings.

Class Two (Very Good):

This car is well restored with an eye for detail. The interior and exterior show minimal wear, and it runs and rides smoothly. The car is driven very little (maybe 800 to 1,000 miles per year). This class is a slight grade below Class One. A Class Two has not been detailed to the extent that a Class One has been. This class (Class Two) has some evidence of use and wear, although not very much. It is considered “cherry” or “mint”. This vehicle might appear as a Class One until judged against one. It would not qualify as a 95, or better, “point” vehicle. (This class should have no rust on the undercarriage, not even surface rust. The undercarriage should be detailed as new.)

Class Three (Good):

This is a functional, drivable vehicle in good overall condition needing no, or only minor work. Most vehicles at car shows reflect this condition. This car is what is termed a “20 footer”. From 20 feet, it may look very good. Close inspection, however, would reveal some worn interior trim, and less than perfect paint (worn, and perhaps faded). You may even see some early evidence that surface rust is beginning in the body panels. This car is completely operational and is an “older restoration”. It is driven fairly often, runs great, and is enjoyed by its owner. It is probably a candidate for a full restoration. The undercarriage may display surface rust, and may be in need of detailing. Chrome and trim may exhibit limited pitting

Class Four (Fair):

This type of car is a fun “driver” with a solid frame and is structurally sound. This car is in need of considerable work. It needs work in and out. Cosmetics, body, and mechanical components all need work, to some degree. It is not a serious collector candidate. Soft floors, isolated areas where rust has eaten through (but not structural), excessive use of Bondo, lots of pitted chrome, glass repairs are symptoms of this condition. Badly soiled headliners, badly soiled and ripped upholstery, rusted out trunks are also signs.

Class Five (Poor):

This type of car is in need of complete restoration and may, or may not, be able to be driven. The exterior body panels have significant areas of rust-through. The floor and structural components may, or may not, be intact. This car is usually the first project for layman’s attempt at restoration.

Class Six (Parts Car):

This type of car is good for parts only.

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